dreammoon23:

Forgot to share this beautiful #pegmatite that @csaunders722 got me this summer

earthstory:

Plunging Anticline

This view out the window of a plane shows a gigantic fold in Dinosaur National Monument.

The rocks are part of the Split Mountain anticline. Just guessing, but its name might well be because it looks like the mountain has been split in half.

An anticline is a type of fold. In this case, older rocks form the core of the structure while younger rocks form the outer edges. The rocks were pushed upwards, which can stretch and break the rocks at the hinge of the fold, making them weaker and easier to erode.

The rocks on the outer edges of this anticline are sandstones that are fairly resistant to erosion, while older rocks in the middle are more easily eroded. Once the outer sandstone layers were fractured at the fold hinge, they eroded away and exposed the more easily eroded layers at the core. The unfractured rocks away from the hinge still stand tall, creating the two limbs of the mountains.

This anticline also is a plunging anticline. You see it literally is disappearing towards the right side of this image; the fold is pushed upwards much more in the left side of the shot than in the right.

-JBB

Image credit: Copyright © Marli Miller, University of Oregon, Image source: Earth Science World Image Bank http://www.earthscienceworld.org/images , used for educational/outreach purposes

Read more:
http://nature.nps.gov/geology/education/Foos/dino.pdf

Structural geology doings Structural geology doings Structural geology doings

Oh yeah, so I’m the President of George Mason’s Geology Club

jtotheizzoe:

You guys like Saturn, right? Here’s a whole gallery of Saturn GIFs, from rings to moons, captured by the Cassini spacecraft. They’re part modern art and part science.
Next to the Voyager twins, I think Cassini might be the best satellite NASA ever launched. Certainly takes the best pictures. Tumblr’s own staceythinx  has an iPad app called Cassini HD that features even more photos, plus color, plus science.
(GIFs by framesandflames)

Not really Geology but definitely related! Maybe Planetary Geology? Whatever jtotheizzoe:

You guys like Saturn, right? Here’s a whole gallery of Saturn GIFs, from rings to moons, captured by the Cassini spacecraft. They’re part modern art and part science.
Next to the Voyager twins, I think Cassini might be the best satellite NASA ever launched. Certainly takes the best pictures. Tumblr’s own staceythinx  has an iPad app called Cassini HD that features even more photos, plus color, plus science.
(GIFs by framesandflames)

Not really Geology but definitely related! Maybe Planetary Geology? Whatever jtotheizzoe:

You guys like Saturn, right? Here’s a whole gallery of Saturn GIFs, from rings to moons, captured by the Cassini spacecraft. They’re part modern art and part science.
Next to the Voyager twins, I think Cassini might be the best satellite NASA ever launched. Certainly takes the best pictures. Tumblr’s own staceythinx  has an iPad app called Cassini HD that features even more photos, plus color, plus science.
(GIFs by framesandflames)

Not really Geology but definitely related! Maybe Planetary Geology? Whatever jtotheizzoe:

You guys like Saturn, right? Here’s a whole gallery of Saturn GIFs, from rings to moons, captured by the Cassini spacecraft. They’re part modern art and part science.
Next to the Voyager twins, I think Cassini might be the best satellite NASA ever launched. Certainly takes the best pictures. Tumblr’s own staceythinx  has an iPad app called Cassini HD that features even more photos, plus color, plus science.
(GIFs by framesandflames)

Not really Geology but definitely related! Maybe Planetary Geology? Whatever jtotheizzoe:

You guys like Saturn, right? Here’s a whole gallery of Saturn GIFs, from rings to moons, captured by the Cassini spacecraft. They’re part modern art and part science.
Next to the Voyager twins, I think Cassini might be the best satellite NASA ever launched. Certainly takes the best pictures. Tumblr’s own staceythinx  has an iPad app called Cassini HD that features even more photos, plus color, plus science.
(GIFs by framesandflames)

Not really Geology but definitely related! Maybe Planetary Geology? Whatever jtotheizzoe:

You guys like Saturn, right? Here’s a whole gallery of Saturn GIFs, from rings to moons, captured by the Cassini spacecraft. They’re part modern art and part science.
Next to the Voyager twins, I think Cassini might be the best satellite NASA ever launched. Certainly takes the best pictures. Tumblr’s own staceythinx  has an iPad app called Cassini HD that features even more photos, plus color, plus science.
(GIFs by framesandflames)

Not really Geology but definitely related! Maybe Planetary Geology? Whatever jtotheizzoe:

You guys like Saturn, right? Here’s a whole gallery of Saturn GIFs, from rings to moons, captured by the Cassini spacecraft. They’re part modern art and part science.
Next to the Voyager twins, I think Cassini might be the best satellite NASA ever launched. Certainly takes the best pictures. Tumblr’s own staceythinx  has an iPad app called Cassini HD that features even more photos, plus color, plus science.
(GIFs by framesandflames)

Not really Geology but definitely related! Maybe Planetary Geology? Whatever

jtotheizzoe:

You guys like Saturn, right? Here’s a whole gallery of Saturn GIFs, from rings to moons, captured by the Cassini spacecraft. They’re part modern art and part science.

Next to the Voyager twins, I think Cassini might be the best satellite NASA ever launched. Certainly takes the best pictures. Tumblr’s own staceythinx  has an iPad app called Cassini HD that features even more photos, plus color, plus science.

(GIFs by framesandflames)

Not really Geology but definitely related! Maybe Planetary Geology? Whatever

(via itwasagoodrun)

ageofdestruction:

hannah: Surface of Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 25th November 2005.
Image runs from 32°S 201°E about 710 km due south across the Terra Sirenum highlands to 44°S 201°E. The Sirenum Fossae run across the top of the 2nd image. The 5th and 6th images show a central section of the 300 km-wide Newton Crater, including what looks like part of the central peak complex (notice dunes, dark blue, on the left hand side).
Composite of 3 visible light images for colour, and one monochrome image for detail. Colour balance is not naturalistic.
Image credit: ESA. Composite: AgeOfDestruction.
ageofdestruction:

hannah: Surface of Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 25th November 2005.
Image runs from 32°S 201°E about 710 km due south across the Terra Sirenum highlands to 44°S 201°E. The Sirenum Fossae run across the top of the 2nd image. The 5th and 6th images show a central section of the 300 km-wide Newton Crater, including what looks like part of the central peak complex (notice dunes, dark blue, on the left hand side).
Composite of 3 visible light images for colour, and one monochrome image for detail. Colour balance is not naturalistic.
Image credit: ESA. Composite: AgeOfDestruction.
ageofdestruction:

hannah: Surface of Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 25th November 2005.
Image runs from 32°S 201°E about 710 km due south across the Terra Sirenum highlands to 44°S 201°E. The Sirenum Fossae run across the top of the 2nd image. The 5th and 6th images show a central section of the 300 km-wide Newton Crater, including what looks like part of the central peak complex (notice dunes, dark blue, on the left hand side).
Composite of 3 visible light images for colour, and one monochrome image for detail. Colour balance is not naturalistic.
Image credit: ESA. Composite: AgeOfDestruction.
ageofdestruction:

hannah: Surface of Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 25th November 2005.
Image runs from 32°S 201°E about 710 km due south across the Terra Sirenum highlands to 44°S 201°E. The Sirenum Fossae run across the top of the 2nd image. The 5th and 6th images show a central section of the 300 km-wide Newton Crater, including what looks like part of the central peak complex (notice dunes, dark blue, on the left hand side).
Composite of 3 visible light images for colour, and one monochrome image for detail. Colour balance is not naturalistic.
Image credit: ESA. Composite: AgeOfDestruction.
ageofdestruction:

hannah: Surface of Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 25th November 2005.
Image runs from 32°S 201°E about 710 km due south across the Terra Sirenum highlands to 44°S 201°E. The Sirenum Fossae run across the top of the 2nd image. The 5th and 6th images show a central section of the 300 km-wide Newton Crater, including what looks like part of the central peak complex (notice dunes, dark blue, on the left hand side).
Composite of 3 visible light images for colour, and one monochrome image for detail. Colour balance is not naturalistic.
Image credit: ESA. Composite: AgeOfDestruction.
ageofdestruction:

hannah: Surface of Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 25th November 2005.
Image runs from 32°S 201°E about 710 km due south across the Terra Sirenum highlands to 44°S 201°E. The Sirenum Fossae run across the top of the 2nd image. The 5th and 6th images show a central section of the 300 km-wide Newton Crater, including what looks like part of the central peak complex (notice dunes, dark blue, on the left hand side).
Composite of 3 visible light images for colour, and one monochrome image for detail. Colour balance is not naturalistic.
Image credit: ESA. Composite: AgeOfDestruction.

ageofdestruction:

hannah: Surface of Mars, photographed by Mars Express, 25th November 2005.

Image runs from 32°S 201°E about 710 km due south across the Terra Sirenum highlands to 44°S 201°E. The Sirenum Fossae run across the top of the 2nd image. The 5th and 6th images show a central section of the 300 km-wide Newton Crater, including what looks like part of the central peak complex (notice dunes, dark blue, on the left hand side).

Composite of 3 visible light images for colour, and one monochrome image for detail. Colour balance is not naturalistic.

Image credit: ESA. Composite: AgeOfDestruction.

(via bblackmamba)